WHAT DO THE PUBLIC THINK OF INDUSTRIAL HERITAGE?

Earlier this year, English Heritage commissioned BDRC Continental to do a survey into people’s attitudes towards industrial heritage. 2,007 adults in England completed the online survey. 189 adults responded from the West Midlands (209 weighted), 60% had lived in the local area for 20 years or more.

Why industrial heritage is important

  • 64% of those in the West Midlands agree that the industrial revolution is the most important period of British history (63% England)
  • 56% of those in the West Midlands agree that the local area where they live is well known for a particular type of industry (43% in England)
  • 90% of those in the West Midlands agree that “it is important that we value and appreciate the industrial heritage we have in this country” (87% England)
  • 87% of those in the West Midlands agree “it is important to identify the industrial heritage sites of significance, so they can be protected” (86% England)
  • 83% of those in the West Midlands agree that “our industrial heritage is as important to preserve as our castles and country houses” (80% England)

Why there is an issue

  • 52% of those in the West Midlands agree that “we seem to care less about what happens to the industrial heritage sites of this country than most of our other heritage sites” (57% England)

Industrial heritage is important for identity

  • 76% of those in the West Midlands agree that its industrial heritage sites ‘are an important reminder of what makes this country great’. (71% England)
  • 70% of those in the West Midlands agree that its industrial heritage sites ‘are important in making this area of England special’. (62% England)
  • 68% of those in the West Midlands agree that its industrial heritage sites ‘provide me with an important connection to this area’s history’. (62% England)
  • 59% of those in the West Midlands agree that its industrial heritage sites ‘make me feel proud of my local area’. (56% England)
  • 41% of those in the West Midlands agree that its industrial heritage sites ‘provide a link to my or my family’s history’. (33% England)
  • 36% of those in the West Midlands agree that its industrial heritage sites ‘are important to me because my direct ancestors worked in those buildings’. (29% England)

Industrial heritage is important for the economy

  • 69% of those in the West Midlands agree that its industrial heritage sites ‘help to attract visitors to the local area’. (61% England)
  • 50% of those in the West Midlands agree that its industrial heritage sites ‘play an important role in the local economy’. (40% England)
  • 48% of those in the West Midlands agree that its industrial heritage sites ‘are a reminder of the economic decline of the area’. (41% England)

Industrial heritage is important for quality of life

  • 78% of those in the West Midlands agree that its industrial heritage sites ‘are important to pass down to future generations’. (75% England)

When asked what words of phrases they associate with local industrial heritage sites

  • West Midlands ‘educational’ (55%) – England (51%)
  • West Midlands ‘thought provoking (47%) – England (41%)
  • West Midlands ‘inspiring’ (41%) – England (33%)
  • West Midlands ‘decaying’ (29%) – England (26%)
  • West Midlands ‘famous’ (26%) – England (20%)

Getting involved

  • 46% of people in the West Midlands would be interested in ‘getting involved with helping to protect the industrial heritage’, for example through volunteering or helping with fundraising’ (44% England). 10% would be very interested (10% England)

The future for industrial heritage

  • 71% of those in the West Midlands agree that “industrial heritage sites should be reused for other, modern day purposes, but make sure that their character is preserved” (71% England), 92% in the West Midlands agree that “industrial sites should be preserved to remind us of our industrial past (85% England). Only 5% in the West Midlands agree that “industrial sites should be demolished and replaced with modern buildings and structures” (8% England) and 10% in West Midlands agree “industrial heritage sites should be left exactly as they are to decay naturally” (12% England).

 

 

Ok, now tell me that Sandfields Pumping Station is not worth saving for the community.

Source:

 

English Heritage

Posted in Sandfields Pumping Station | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

The next meeting of the Lichfield Waterworks Trust (Friends of Sandfields Pumping Station)

The next meeting of the Lichfield Waterworks Trust (Friends of Sandfields Pumping Station) will take place on Thursday 28 January @7:30pm

The venue is:

Duke of York

23/25 Greenhill

Lichfield

Staffordshire

WS13 6DY

 

T: 01543 300 386

 

This is a public meeting and is to be used as a brainstorming session to focus on our vision for LWT and what we want to achieve, so everyone is welcome.

 

The meeting will be hosted by Philip Mantom of Fillip Training: http://www.fillip.training/

 

Philip has a wealth of experience in designing and delivering training that leads to change in organisations and individuals. Philip also has a vast knowledge of funding option and heritage lottery bids; we are pleased to have him on-board.

 

The evening will be open to your ideas and suggestions so that we can make Sandfields Pumping Station a sustainable entity and enable it to deliver the objectives of the Lichfield Waterworks Trust.

 

LWT’s Charitable objectives are to

  • promote and preserve for the benefit of the public the nineteenth century Sandfields Pumping Station complex and associated infrastructure and to facilitate its safety, conservation, security and accessibility.
  • promote and preserve for the benefit of the public the unique 1873 Cornish Beam Engine and other fixtures and fittings situated at Sandfields Pumping Station.
  • promote access to the complex for the purposes of education, community development, and protection of the historic environment.

 

The evening is open to anyone who would like to be part of this exciting project, and is an opportunity for you to shape the way forward.

Notes from the November 2015 meeting can be found here

Posted in Sandfields Pumping Station | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

The elixir of longer life, on tap

If I were to say to you, that there is a compound that can extend the life expectancy of the average human being by twenty five years, would you be interested? Unfortunately developing this compound would require the finest minds, the latest, most innovative technology and vast sums of money to develop and isolate it, so it could be delivered in a safe form for the benefit of everyone, would you be still interested or think I was mad….

Well I am not mad, thought sometimes I think it helps, because we already have this magical compound. So just to prove to you that the finest minds, the latest, most innovative technology and vast sums of money have already be utilised to bring you clean drinking water.

One John Snow proved the link between water and cholera, some of the finest minds, developed the latest, most innovative technology and invested vast sums of money to bring clean water to the homes of everyday people, and it changed the world for the better.

Sandfields Pumping Station in Lichfield is the home of clean water, and bought relief to the beleaguered communities of the industrial Black Country. So next time you time you turn on a tap to take a drink of clean water, take a moment or two to think about the technology that delivers water to your home, and where it all started.

The story of clean water is a remarkable story of human endeavour and achievement which the Lichfield Waterworks Trust would like to share with you. We want to share this story, not by telling you the facts, or by giving you a book to read or a cleaver lecture, but by inviting you to visit one of the redundant pumping stations and just exploring the place for yourself.

  • No interpretation panels, or wordy explanations
  • No ‘we will tell you what we think you need to know’.
  • No over enthusiastic guides to bombard you with facts and dates

 We just want to say ‘please touch’, pick this object up and hold it, feel free to explore and free your mind. Just enjoy the amazing sense of place. And final then, if you do have a question, we will do our best to answer it.

 

Posted in Sandfields Pumping Station | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Genealogy: Researching Your Family Tree, hosted by FutureLearn.

There is an interesting course coming up in March 2016; Genealogy: Researching Your Family Tree, hosted by FutureLearn.

FutureLearn is a private company set up and run by the Open University who organise these mass online courses. I have done a couple of these myself and will say they are great fun, and they are free. This one is set out over 6 weeks, and would need about 4 hours per week of your time. This of course is not cast in stone, there is quite a lot of flexibility so there is plenty of choice in how much you put into it.

Sandfields Pumping Station most certainly has a rich social and family history associated with it that is proving both fascinating and rewarding to understand.

About the course:

This free online course will help you develop an understanding of the basic genealogy techniques and how to communicate your family history. We will consider how to effectively find and analyse sources and explore the potential of DNA testing as applied to genealogy. We’ll help you add historical context to your family history and discuss how to record and communicate research findings in a clear fashion.

Details in the link below, enjoy

Genealogy: Researching Your Family Tree, by FutureLearn.

 

 

 

Posted in Sandfields Pumping Station, Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

People of the Water Treatment Works

I have been meaning to post this photo for some time now. It was given to me by our very own Keith Jonson (middle row, fifth from the left) who worked as a chemists for the South Staffs Waterworks since he left school.

Sandfields-Lab-Staffv1

Taken at Sandfields Pumping Station it shows some of the staff who worked in the now demolished water treatment works at Sandfields.

You can hear Keith Johnson’s story of life at South Staffs Water here:

South Staffs Water has a reputation of being a long term employer, the staff embraced to ethos of the company, who from all accounts ‘treated their employees right’. We would really love to know who the other people are in this remarkable photograph.

 

 

Posted in Sandfields Pumping Station | Tagged , | Leave a comment

November Progress Meeting of the Lichfield Waterworks Trust

Monthly Progress Meeting of the Lichfield Waterworks Trust, formerly known as the Friends of Sandfields Pumping Station.
Thursday 26 November @ 7:30pm
The meeting place is;
Duke of York
23/25 Greenhill
Lichfield
Staffordshire
WS13 6DY

T: 01543 300 386

The Lichfield Waterworks Trust is a Community Incorporated Organisation, registered with the charities commission who are fighting to save the Grade II* listed building known as Sandfields Pumping Station for the benefit of the community.
The unique 190 Hp Cornish Beam Engine and building are a magnificent monument to the lives of the people who died in the black Country during the mid nineteenth century due to the cholera epidemics. It also celebrates the achievements of the Victorian water engineers who gave clean water to the nation.
English Heritage has designated Sandfields Pumping Station as a building that has ‘more than special interest’, hence the reason it has been listed at Grade II*
At a meeting on 23 October 2015 held at the offices of Lichfield District Council, Persimmon Homes PLC agreed that they would transfer the freehold or grant a long term lease to the Lichfield Waterworks Trust to secure the future of this building.
Member of LWT have worked tirelessly over the last three years, however now with this access agreement in place, the real hard work begins.
All are welcome to become involved in this challenging but rewarding project.
Excellent food and drinks are available in the bar.

Meeting notes for the October Meeting

We do not share your personal data with anyone else whatsoever, however we do like to have your details correct, so if there are any errors or omissions, please let us know by responding to this email.

Posted in Sandfields Pumping Station | Tagged | Leave a comment

Visit to Leawood Pump House – Derbyshire

Sunday 1 November 2015 @12:00 noon

The Lichfield waterworks Trust will be visiting Leawood Pump house, one of the few working none rotive beam engines still running off live steam. The engine and the buildings are owned by Derbyshire County Council with accesses managed by a group of volunteers.

It is an ideal model that could be adapted to the ongoing management of Sandfields Pumping Station. The guys at Leawood Pump House do absolutely sterling work, and show how preserving and making our industrial heritage accessible can be done in a very simple and cost effective way.

Leawood Pump House

Directions

The pump house is located adjacent to the Cromford canal where it crosses over the River Derwent. (SK 315 557) Access is via the canal towpath.

Car parking is available at:
Cromford Wharf – a pleasant 1½ mile walk along the towpath.
High Peak Junction car park – a ¼ mile walk.

Parking charges now apply on the car parks.

Cromford is on the A6 between Matlock and Derby. From the A6, turn at Cromford crossroads onto Mill Lane. Proceed past Arkwright’s mill, the entrance to Cromford Wharf car park is immediately on the right. For High Peak Junction car park, continue past the railway station. The road follows the river down the valley, before turning left into Lea Bridge. The car park is signposted on the corner.

Posted in Sandfields Pumping Station | Tagged | Leave a comment